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Welcome

To find out about how RAG works or become a member, visit the About RAG section

If you’re looking for information about religious archives in the UK or how to look after your own archives, visit the Advice and Guidance pages

For information about the yearly RAG conference and other events, visit the Conferences and Events pages

To find out about our projects, visit the Current Projects section

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Religious Archives Group Conference 2018

hereThe RAG conference for 2018 will be held on Thursday 10th May 2018 at King’s College London (Strand Campus, in the Council Room). The topic is Military chaplaincy in WW1. Details of the programme can be found here, and the booking form here.

Catholic Archives Society Conference 2018

We draw members attention to this event:

Catholic Archives Society
ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2018
Monday 21 to Wednesday 23 May
High Leigh Conference Centre
Lord Street, Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire
EN11 8SG
Tel: 01992 463016

The conference home page, with the full programme and booking form, is at

https://catholicarchivesociety.org/training-events/conference-agm/conference-2018/

New England Company

The Religious Archives Group will begin posting regular items on our website, whether they are news items or general interest. Further to the posting I made on the Religious Archives list serve in the summer, I will post our first item on our website about the New England Company.

The New England Company was founded in 1649, becoming the first English Protestant missionary society. Originally called the ‘Society for the propagation of the gospel in New England and the parts adjacent in America’, its initial aim was to convert Native Americans to Christianity through the work of missionaries.

Please follow this link for the full article:

https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/things-to-do/london-metropolitan-archives/the-collections/Pages/new-england-company.aspx

Developing a Baptist Archives

This Manual is from the Baptist World Alliance Heritage and Identity Commission site, at http://www.bwa-baptist-heritage.org/index.htm.  I would hesitate at some of the advice given but it’s written in an accessible way, and the Commission has given serious thought to the digital challenge,

“[The Manual] is based on professional principles and uses traditional paper documents and processes which were the standard when it was first written in the 1990s.

Since then, of course, the digital world has appeared, and this means that archiving procedures and policies have to make the transition. As far as archives are concerned, the new digital world is the same only different – the same because the end process is still to preserve records for as long as they are needed in such a way that they are well kept and accessible to those who will use them. However the records themselves are different, the processes used to create, manage and retrieve them are different, and the media on which they reside and means of managing them are different. There are other differences too, but that gives a simple outline of the situation.

There are at least two aspects to going digital – one is to manage the documents now being created digitally (they are “born digital”), while the other is turn existing paper records into a digital form (so they become “re-born digital” documents), and then of course, to manage them in the same way as those born digital.”